Think showering is an act best confined to your bathroom? Think again, because mother nature has bestowed upon us an abundance of natural showers to drench ourselves under. They come in all shapes and sizes, from 1,000ft torrents to 30ft trickles, some icy cold others pleasantly balmy. All you have to do is choose which type of natural shower you want… but this is easier said than done when given so much choice. So to get you started here are a few of Dr. Squatch’s favorite waterfalls where you can enjoy a refreshing scrub the way nature intended.

Calf Creek Falls, Utah

Nestled away in Utah’s mammoth Grand Staircase-Escalate National Monument is the oasis of Calf Creek Falls. First up head to the Calf Creek Falls campground, 15 miles east from Escalante on Utah State Route 12. From here it’s a 6 mile round trip to the falls, along a trail following Calf Creek. It can get hot on the desert track, but the shady haven created by the looming Navajo sandstone cliffs waits to reward you, and the cool water of Calf Creek Falls makes it a perfect place to wash off the sweat and sand. This 126ft waterfall flows all year round, so anytime of year is the best time of year to take a natural shower here.

Zapata Falls, Colorado

Snow melt from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains takes its perpetual journey along the Rio Grande River to finally flow over Zapata Falls. Even in the summer the water tumbling down the 30ft drop is icy cold. To find it drive 8 miles south from the Great Sand Dunes National Park visitor centre, then take a left turn and drive east for 3.5 miles along the gravel road. Look out for the sign showing where the trail starts, and then it’s just a short 1/2 mile hike down to the secluded falls. You’ll have to scramble over slippery rocks and wade through water to reach this hidden gem, but it’s worth it. Definitely one for cold shower fans, but don’t try this spot in the winter as the waterfall completely freezes over.

Alamere Falls, California

Over the cliffs of the Point Reyes National Seashore pours a 40ft tidefall, an extremely rare type of waterfall that cascades into the ocean. There are just two tidefalls on the East Coast, and Alameda Falls is the only one accessible by foot. From Bolinas, Marin County, you’ll need to drive out of town along Mesa Road until you reach the parking lot at Palomarin Trailhead. Then hike the coast trail, which meanders inland past Bass Lake and Pelican Lake before reaching Alamere Falls. Roughly an 8.5 mile round trip, it’s pretty easy going with some great ocean views until the clamber down the cliff face, which looks worse than it is. The best thing about Alamere Falls? It tumbles straight onto Wildcat Beach, so take your surfboard, ride some empty waves and enjoy a natural fresh water rinse afterwards!

Your Local Natural Shower

Not sure where you’re nearest waterfall is? No problem, just head over to the World Waterfall Database to find out. Pinpoint your local natural shower, pack a bar of Dr. Squatch Soap and scrub up Squatch Style!

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About Jack Taylor

Jack Taylor’s stories have been printed in The Yak and KuBan, and published online at SurfSection, Deus Ex Machina, Drift Surfing and Drifting Thru. When not writing he’s out catching waves or planning his next overseas adventure. Follow him @byJackTaylor


The Great Outdoors, Ultimate Guides